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Eclipse composite
  
 
lighthound
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Eclipse composite


I would like to hear your thoughts about each of these layouts before I print.
I have a couple of 36x11.75 frames that I will be printing these for.
To save a little $$ I will be printing them as a two off 36x24 and just cut the print in half for each frame.

I started out (image #1) including many partials, but by doing so I am limiting the size of individual frames. Thus will not be able to take advantage of all my pixels. I have many many more partials to use as I shot every 5 minutes before and after totality. About 3 hours of shooting.

Image #2 shows another version where I scrunched them together in order to increase the vertical size of each frame.
Feels too scrunched to me toward the center.

Image #3 shows my latest version where I omitted a few of the partials in order to use all my pixels.
This is a simpler version and I'll still be able to print @ 285 ppi and use all my available pixels to allow the viewer to see fine details better such as sunspots, stars and solar prominence.

Which looks best and would you do anything different?

Edit: I posted these @1400 wide. Not sure if that too wide for everyone's monitor.

Dave





#1 many partials well spaced







#2 many partials scrunched together







#3 simplified few partials for maximum details




Sep 13, 2017 at 12:59 PM
ben egbert
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Eclipse composite


I am torn between 1 and 3, 2 is out for me. I really like the way one lays out and I wonder if you really need a lot of detail at the printed size?

Great job by the way.



Sep 13, 2017 at 03:35 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Eclipse composite


Interesting, I prefer the first.

Great idea!

Bob



Sep 13, 2017 at 04:35 PM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Eclipse composite


1


Sep 13, 2017 at 06:54 PM
eeneryma
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Eclipse composite


If there was ever a wall hanger, this is it!!!! 1 for me too.

Steve



Sep 13, 2017 at 10:07 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Eclipse composite


1


Sep 13, 2017 at 11:40 PM
lighthound
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Eclipse composite


#1 it is then! This gives me a great sense of relief actually because that's the one I had already sent to the printer shop. They've been dragging their feet and I haven't gotten the print back yet so I was thinking about changing the order before they print.

Sound like I should be good to go if they ever successfully download the massive 385mb file I sent them.

I have over 46 hours of pp work on that center image of the totality. I have learned more about working with PS on that single image than all images combined in the last year. My brain was leaking a little after that one. I think it turned out pretty nice and was well worth it.

Thanks for the feedback folks!


Dave



Sep 13, 2017 at 11:53 PM
 

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eeneryma
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Eclipse composite


lighthound wrote:
#1 it is then! This gives me a great sense of relief actually because that's the one I had already sent to the printer shop. They've been dragging their feet and I haven't gotten the print back yet so I was thinking about changing the order before they print.

Sound like I should be good to go if they ever successfully download the massive 385mb file I sent them.

I have over 46 hours of pp work on that center image of the totality. I have learned more about working with PS on that single image than all images combined
...Show more

An artwork to be really proud of, worth all the effort that you put into it.
Steve



Sep 14, 2017 at 03:10 AM
DaleBerlin
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Eclipse composite


I just saw this, and wow, you did a wonderful job here Dave. Very very fine work on the corona, and the changing cloud patterns really gives character and "sense of time" to the progression. Its a moot point now, but I like your choice of #1. I am curious though, why didn't you keep the direction of the moon constant throughout the progression?


Sep 19, 2017 at 07:47 PM
lighthound
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Eclipse composite


DaleBerlin wrote:
I just saw this, and wow, you did a wonderful job here Dave. Very very fine work on the corona, and the changing cloud patterns really gives character and "sense of time" to the progression. Its a moot point now, but I like your choice of #1. I am curious though, why didn't you keep the direction of the moon constant throughout the progression?



Thanks for the kind words Dale! I'm glad you commented on the clouds as I was wondering if people would see them as a plus by adding realism and some drama. I have a few hundred different ones to choose from, ok, maybe not that many, but I chose the ones I thought told the story best from that day. It was a close call for sure.


Direction of the moon constant? I'm not sure what you mean. These were all taken over the course of 3 hours and are shown as they actually occurred. The only thing I didn't do was angle them across the frame to simulate the actual trajectory path.

Now that I think about it, maybe you're referring to why my partials seem to be perfectly adjacent from each other?
The answer to that is because they were from my location in the US. You have probably seen others from out west where it occurred earlier in the day and the sun/moons path were more diagonal. Here on the east coast the ecliptic path was almost perfectly horizontal which made me happy. Even the Sun's corona details from it's poles changed from west coast to east coast where mine are almost straight up and down. Cool stuff for sure.

I'm still working on my final totality shot.
I just hope I can remember 1/3 of the PS stuff I have learned from this project.


Dave





Sep 19, 2017 at 08:57 PM
DaleBerlin
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Eclipse composite


I may be wrong here, but here is what I meant by "Direction of the Moon". I assume time is passing as we go from left to right in your series. So, the second image from left shows the Moon starting to eclipse the sun from the Sun's top right side. I would then expect the Moon to end the eclipse from the Sun's bottom left side (next to last image). I would expect the "Direction of the Moon" to be a diagonal line starting from the Sun's top right side, going through the Sun's center, and finally ending at the Sun's bottom left side. Your next to last image shows it ending in top left. Am I missing something?


Sep 20, 2017 at 02:41 AM
lighthound
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Eclipse composite


Yep, what you are missing is that little word I snuck in on you above in my reply.
It's called "Ecliptic path" and it's basically the trajectory of both the sun and the moon caused by both the earth's rotation as well as the moon's orbit around earth.
It's definitely some funky stuff and took me awhile to get it right in my head also.

So with that said.
No matter what coast you are near (West or East) the totality will always begin with a diamond ring on the left and ends with a diamond ring on the right side. Partials as you see in my image just the same.

From western sites the diamond rings will be at lower left (at the start) and upper right (at the
end). This is because the ecliptic (centerline) path is roughly a 45 deg angle relative to the horizon.

Whereas from eastern sites the ecliptic (centerline) is nearly horizontal or parallel with the horizon.
Thus the reason my partials appear to be symmetrical from one side to the other.

Now to add yet another brain fart moment into the equation...

Depending on if you are standing to the north or south of the totality centerline (the path the eclipse followed across the USA) the partials and diamond rings will appear either at the top or to the bottom area of the disk.

I was located to the north side of the centerline and only had 96 seconds of totality rather than the full 156 seconds, thus my partials and diamond rings were located along the top edges (approx 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock positions)
If I would have moved down the road a few miles from my house to get into the centerline, the partials and diamonds would have been perfectly across from each other (9 o'clock and 3 o'clock positions).

So basically it all boils down to these key factors.
1) The Earth's rotation
2) The Moon's orbit around earth
3) Your location relative to the timing of the event. (West or East coast)
4) Your location relative to the centerline of totality. (North or South)

I hope all that helps explain it better.

Also, on a side note. If you look really close you will see my first and last images in the composites are not full sun images and are of what is called 1st contact (C1) and 4th contact (C4). The 2nd and 3rd contacts are basically the diamond rings if you will, which I'm still working on my finals.

Dave



Sep 20, 2017 at 05:06 PM
DaleBerlin
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Eclipse composite


Bingo "I was located to the north side of the centerline", OK now I get it. I viewed it from the centerline in Tennessee , so moon entered top right and exited bottom left. It is a point of view thing lol. Thank for clearing that up for me. And congrats on the wonderful images.


Sep 20, 2017 at 06:15 PM







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